Brian Kavanagh CV

Filmmaker

PRODUCER/DIRECTOR - A CITY'S CHILD

GOLD SOUTHERN CROSS AWARD BEST FILM

AFI BEST ACTOR AWARD

LONDON,EDINBURGH & CHICAGO FILM FESTIVALS

LONDON FILM FESTIVAL
And Brian Kavanagh's intense view of a lonely spinster in Sydney, finding  kinky consolation in the collection of dolls, " A City's Child," creates an errie atmosphere which remained with me long after most of the festival's other films had been and gone. .
ERIC SHORTER.
London Daily Telegraph. December 1st 1971.

 MOST MATURE
The best and most mature of the Australian features is "A City's Child" produced and direccted by Brian Kavanagh. Set in a middle class suburb of Melbourne, the film, written by Don Battye, treats the loneliness of a thirtyish spinster who, following the death of her carping, invalid mother, builds a world of fantasy out of solitude and frustration.
SYDNEY MORNING HERALD. Friday June 9, 1972

"There can be no mistaking Brian Kavanagh's exceptional talent as a director. Throughout, the precision of his camera placements, the flow of movement within the frame, and the exacting performances serve perfectly the underlying ambiguity of events and produce a masterpiece in miniature."
Ken Quinell
NATION - JANUARY 22 1972

 A CITY'S CHILD TO BE RESTORED AND RE-RELEASED.

FROG DREAMING

AFI AWARD BEST EDITING

CHRIS EYRE REVIEWS
Most Australians my age, and of my taste, can't stand Australian movies. It's all the same drama or comedy. However 'Frog Dreaming', as I've always known it, is a film I can't argue against. Australia makes quality childrens entertainment and this movie is testimony to that. It's fun and clever. An adventure film for all kids. Set in Victoria, my home state, it shows off parts of our land and culture I still enjoy to watch now in my twenties. I'm also biased by the fact that Henry wears a St Kilda Saints jersey through parts of the movie. Go Saints! I also enjoy the gadjets Cody creates, very like The Goonies charcter Data.
I happen to have an old ex-rental copy and refuse to watch it because I don't want to ruin the already faded tape. I would by it imediately if it were to be released on DVD.
I want to see more movies like this coming out of Australia. Charming, childlike and adventurous. But then again, it was the Eighties, and films were better then. Detailed characters and dialogue without having to rely on FX. For instance Tamsin West's dialogue is hilarious and smart.
A more innocent film than the current time seems capable of producing. For those who like to watch an adventure movie, rather than be shown FX.

TIME OUT NY FILM GUIDE
Something's alive at the bottom of an uncharted pond, and 10-year-old adventurer Cody (Henry Thomas of ET) is determined to find it. Director Trenchard-Smith sets the action of this children's movie (involving aboriginal magic) in a remote town in southern Australia, constructing the parallel worlds of doting adults and their irrepressible children as a foundation for his adventure in minutiae. The real adventure, however, is Trenchard-Smith's rediscovery of boyhood, with all its inventiveness, innocence and independent, fearless strength.

 AFI AWARD BEST EDITING

 

CHRIS EYRE REVIEWS

Most Australians my age, and of my taste, can't stand Australian movies. It's all the same drama or comedy. However 'Frog Dreaming', as I've always known it, is a film I can't argue against. Australia makes quality childrens entertainment and this movie is testimony to that. It's fun and clever. An adventure film for all kids. Set in Victoria, my home state, it shows off parts of our land and culture I still enjoy to watch now in my twenties. I'm also biased by the fact that Henry wears a St Kilda Saints jersey through parts of the movie. Go Saints! I also enjoy the gadjets Cody creates, very like The Goonies charcter Data.

I happen to have an old ex-rental copy and refuse to watch it because I don't want to ruin the already faded tape. I would by it imediately if it were to be released on DVD.

I want to see more movies like this coming out of Australia. Charming, childlike and adventurous. But then again, it was the Eighties, and films were better then. Detailed characters and dialogue without having to rely on FX. For instance Tamsin West's dialogue is hilarious and smart.

A more innocent film than the current time seems capable of producing. For those who like to watch an adventure movie, rather than be shown FX.

TIME OUT NY FILM GUIDE

Something's alive at the bottom of an uncharted pond, and 10-year-old adventurer Cody (Henry Thomas of ET) is determined to find it. Director Trenchard-Smith sets the action of this children's movie (involving aboriginal magic) in a remote town in southern Australia, constructing the parallel worlds of doting adults and their irrepressible children as a foundation for his adventure in minutiae. The real adventure, however, is Trenchard-Smith's rediscovery of boyhood, with all its inventiveness, innocence and independent, fearless strength.

 


CHRIS EYRE REVIEWS
Most Australians my age, and of my taste, can't stand Australian movies. It's all the same drama or comedy. However 'Frog Dreaming', as I've always known it, is a film I can't argue against. Australia makes quality childrens entertainment and this movie is testimony to that. It's fun and clever. An adventure film for all kids. Set in Victoria, my home state, it shows off parts of our land and culture I still enjoy to watch now in my twenties. I'm also biased by the fact that Henry wears a St Kilda Saints jersey through parts of the movie. Go Saints! I also enjoy the gadjets Cody creates, very like The Goonies charcter Data.
I happen to have an old ex-rental copy and refuse to watch it because I don't want to ruin the already faded tape. I would by it imediately if it were to be released on DVD.
I want to see more movies like this coming out of Australia. Charming, childlike and adventurous. But then again, it was the Eighties, and films were better then. Detailed characters and dialogue without having to rely on FX. For instance Tamsin West's dialogue is hilarious and smart.
A more innocent film than the current time seems capable of producing. For those who like to watch an adventure movie, rather than be shown FX.

TIME OUT NY FILM GUIDE
Something's alive at the bottom of an uncharted pond, and 10-year-old adventurer Cody (Henry Thomas of ET) is determined to find it. Director Trenchard-Smith sets the action of this children's movie (involving aboriginal magic) in a remote town in southern Australia, constructing the parallel worlds of doting adults and their irrepressible children as a foundation for his adventure in minutiae. The real adventure, however, is Trenchard-Smith's rediscovery of boyhood, with all its inventiveness, innocence and independent, fearless strength.

 
AFI AWARD BEST EDITING

CHRIS EYRE REVIEWS
Most Australians my age, and of my taste, can't stand Australian movies. It's all the same drama or comedy. However 'Frog Dreaming', as I've always known it, is a film I can't argue against. Australia makes quality childrens entertainment and this movie is testimony to that. It's fun and clever. An adventure film for all kids. Set in Victoria, my home state, it shows off parts of our land and culture I still enjoy to watch now in my twenties. I'm also biased by the fact that Henry wears a St Kilda Saints jersey through parts of the movie. Go Saints! I also enjoy the gadjets Cody creates, very like The Goonies charcter Data.
I happen to have an old ex-rental copy and refuse to watch it because I don't want to ruin the already faded tape. I would by it imediately if it were to be released on DVD.
I want to see more movies like this coming out of Australia. Charming, childlike and adventurous. But then again, it was the Eighties, and films were better then. Detailed characters and dialogue without having to rely on FX. For instance Tamsin West's dialogue is hilarious and smart.
A more innocent film than the current time seems capable of producing. For those who like to watch an adventure movie, rather than be shown FX.

TIME OUT NY FILM GUIDE
Something's alive at the bottom of an uncharted pond, and 10-year-old adventurer Cody (Henry Thomas of ET) is determined to find it. Director Trenchard-Smith sets the action of this children's movie (involving aboriginal magic) in a remote town in southern Australia, constructing the parallel worlds of doting adults and their irrepressible children as a foundation for his adventure in minutiae. The real adventure, however, is Trenchard-Smith's rediscovery of boyhood, with all its inventiveness, innocence and independent, fearless strength.

AFI AWARD BEST EDITING

CHRIS EYRE REVIEWS
Most Australians my age, and of my taste, can't stand Australian movies. It's all the same drama or comedy. However 'Frog Dreaming', as I've always known it, is a film I can't argue against. Australia makes quality childrens entertainment and this movie is testimony to that. It's fun and clever. An adventure film for all kids. Set in Victoria, my home state, it shows off parts of our land and culture I still enjoy to watch now in my twenties. I'm also biased by the fact that Henry wears a St Kilda Saints jersey through parts of the movie. Go Saints! I also enjoy the gadjets Cody creates, very like The Goonies charcter Data.
I happen to have an old ex-rental copy and refuse to watch it because I don't want to ruin the already faded tape. I would by it imediately if it were to be released on DVD.
I want to see more movies like this coming out of Australia. Charming, childlike and adventurous. But then again, it was the Eighties, and films were better then. Detailed characters and dialogue without having to rely on FX. For instance Tamsin West's dialogue is hilarious and smart.
A more innocent film than the current time seems capable of producing. For those who like to watch an adventure movie, rather than be shown FX.

TIME OUT NY FILM GUIDE
Something's alive at the bottom of an uncharted pond, and 10-year-old adventurer Cody (Henry Thomas of ET) is determined to find it. Director Trenchard-Smith sets the action of this children's movie (involving aboriginal magic) in a remote town in southern Australia, constructing the parallel worlds of doting adults and their irrepressible children as a foundation for his adventure in minutiae. The real adventure, however, is Trenchard-Smith's rediscovery of boyhood, with all its inventiveness, innocence and independent, fearless strength.

 

EDITOR - LONG WEEKEND

 

AFI NOMINATION BEST EDITING

ODDITY CINEMA
Lee Boyle
LONG WEEKEND is a unique take on the “Do not mess with the environment: Humans vs. Nature” sub-genre. Released for the first time on DVD a few years ago, the Australian film from 1978 is a realistic horror-thriller with plenty of surprises and chills. Director Colin Eggleston makes this all unfold at a foreboding, slow-boiling, effective pace, highlighted by several scenes perfectly composed. A particularly haunting scene takes place when Marcia is crying in their vehicle on the beach in front of the water after being tormented by sounds and something she saw in the water. Without giving away too much, the last stretch of LONG WEEKEND is quite nerve-wracking as Peter seems to realize what is going on and takes action, all the while slowly losing his grip on reality.I had never even heard of this film and was greatly surprised when it was thought-provoking and provided some good scares. LONG WEEKEND also displayed excellent acting performances, superb sound design and effective good old-fashioned wrangled animals. It was refreshing to see a nature & creature revenge movie that wasn’t campy, opting to provide realistic characters, threats and situations instead.

Review By: Chuck Aliaga  
Published: September 26, 2005
Long Weekend has so many things going for it that it's amazing just how obscure it is outside of Australia. Hargreaves and Behets are phenomenal in the lead roles, creating just the right amount of tense yet reserved love between them throughout the film. We aren't told up front why the tension exists, and the film is all the better for this subtle approach. There are plenty of gradual reveals, which, along with the mounting natural terror, keep the overall level of fear at a near boiling point. This is how to make an effective thriller, an art that is sadly in need of a renaissance.

EYE FOR FILM
Reviewed By: Anton Bitel
"Search a beach long and hard enough and eventually, amidst those countless grains of sand, you are bound to unearth a lost treasure. Long Weekend marked the beginning of a continuous run of competent Australian horror films, penned by Everett De Roche, including Patrick (1978), Roadgames (1981) and Razorback (1984). Where those other, frankly inferior, movies would worm their way into the public consciousness, Long Weekend was destined, like its two main characters, to disappear with little trace. So Optimum Home Entertainment's re-release offers viewers an opportunity to catch up with a lost classic and to see for themselves what a creepy one-off it is, defying all categorisation and eluding easy interpretation, despite a tiny cast and apparent naturalism."

EDITOR - THE NAKED BUNYIP

 

NAKED BUNYIP
infilm.com.au
Luke Buckmaster
"Commonly championed as one of the features responsible for reviving the Australian film industry in the 1970s, The Naked Bunyip is director John B. Murray’s semi-fictional documentary (yes, that genre does exist) about sexual culture in Australia. Chocked to the gills with discussions of censorship, homosexuality, abortion, the pill, prostitution and more, the film is a bible of carnal-related conversation. Watching it in 2008, it’s surprising how little the nature of these discussions have changed."
"Recently featured in Not Quite Hollywood, The Naked Bunyip was an important film in helping to get people talking about sex. It’s a bit too long and waffling to be considered a must-see, but there is plenty here, and appreciators of documentary will dig it."